Connect with us

Commentary: For those who look at the success of SaaS services as portending bad things for open source, the opposite may be true.

Image: Ildo Frazao, Getty Images/iStockphoto

From the earliest days of MongoDB, co-founder Eliot Horowitz planned to build a managed database service. As he stressed in an interview, Horowitz knew that developers wouldn’t want to manage the database themselves if they could get someone to do it for them, provided they wouldn’t sacrifice safety and reliability in the process. The natural complement to open source, in other words, was cloud.

This isn’t to suggest cloud will kill open source. Though Redmonk analyst James Governor is correct to suggest that where developers are concerned, “Convenience is the killer app,” he’s also right to remind us that open source “is a great way to build software, build trust, and foster community,” factors that cloud services don’t necessarily deliver. Even as enterprise customers embrace more Software as a Service (SaaS) vendors like Snowflake or Datadog, open source software will matter more than ever.

Cloudy with a chance of open source

This fact can be overlooked in our rush to cloudify everything. Donald Fischer, CEO and co-founder of Tidelift, said, “Ten years from now much of the complexity around managing open source will be invisible to developers in much the same ways that cloud computing has made people forget about server blades and routers.” Responding to this sentiment, Hacker One CEO Marten Mickos stressed, “We simply MUST automate and package away the current complexities, because we are already busy creating new ones.” 

While this sounds great, not everyone is enthusiastic about the trend. 

SEE: Special report: Prepare for serverless computing (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

For one thing, as analyst Lawrence Hecht pointed out, it’s not clear we “want [open source] to be invisible” to the user. Sure, we might want to eliminate the bother of managing the code, he continued, “but having an auditable trail is valuable.” Even for those who don’t want to inspect or compile source code (and, let’s face it, that’s most of us), it’s useful to have that access, even if we outsource the work of digging into it.

In addition, there’s another risk, highlighted by Duane O’Brien: Eliminating user visibility into the open source software that powers managed cloud services “will also have the effect of adding an insulating layer between users and contributors. That insulating layer will further propagate the notion that open source is something done by other people, with several additional side effects.” One of the most deleterious of effects? It potentially exacerbates the sustainability of open source projects, as Alberto Ruiz noted. It may also reduce some of the enthusiasm developers feel for getting involved, Jason Baker argued.

But, really, this isn’t about cloud versus open source. It’s really a matter of shifting the focus for end users of that software, as Fischer went on to stress: “The analogy of cloud computing vs private data centers illustrates the opportunity: specialists doing the generic work upstream, freeing up time and brainpower to focus on new organization-specific capabilities further up the stack.”

Even for companies that offer proprietary services, open source is essential. Snowflake just went public with its proprietary data warehousing service, but underneath it’s open source software like FoundationDB. Datadog is similar, with Elasticsearch under the hood. And so on. 

We can be grateful for these SaaS companies that make it easier to consume open source software even as we recognize that they simply couldn’t exist without open source. 

Or, as Randy Shoup put it, it comes down to a convenience calculus: “If we have to operate infrastructure, we strongly prefer open source. If we can buy it as a service, we don’t really care what’s inside.” But the reason end users needn’t care is because builders continue to care a great deal about open source. That isn’t going to change anytime soon.

Disclosure: I work for AWS, but the views herein are mine and don’t reflect those of my employer.

Also see



Source link

0
Continue Reading

Technology

Big data and DevOps: No longer separate silos, and that’s a good thing

istock 1209173008

The pandemic has caused major shifts in the way IT and big data work. Now they may be working together for better outcomes.

Image: iStock/ RRice1981

The world has changed a lot since March 2020, and the coronavirus pandemic has affected nearly every aspect of our lives. While we’ve seen massive changes in technology already, another change happening right now is in big data and its role with DevOps.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the blending of data analytics and DevOps, meaning developers, data scientists, and product managers will need to work more closely together than ever before,” said Bill Detwiler, editor in chief of TechRepublic. 

SEE: TechRepublic Premium editorial calendar: IT policies, checklists, toolkits, and research for download  (TechRepublic Premium)

Detwiler was interviewing managers at Tibco, a leader in big data integration and analytics. They said the coronavirus pandemic had caused organizations to rethink how they were using big data and analytics, generating what appears to be a movement toward merging IT DevOps methodologies with big data analytics.

For IT organizations, this is more than just a story about how the pandemic has altered how companies think about big data and analytics. The emergency of COVID has placed emphasis on getting analytics insights and results to market quickly. This has redefined analytics reporting as mission-critical, and not just as an ancillary tool for how companies operate and strategize.

SEE: Return to work: What the new normal will look like post-pandemic (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

The change is also creating revisions in operations and culture for IT. Here are some we’ve seen.

A move from waterfall to DevOps development

Developing, testing, and deploying big data applications is an iterative process. Because the process is iterative (i.e., develop-test-deploy until you get what you want), it doesn’t follow the more linear and assembly line-like development methodology of traditional IT waterfall development, which is a serial sequence of handoffs from development to QA (test) to an implementation staff.

SEE: Are you a big data laggard? Here’s how to catch up (TechRepublic)

A majority of IT departments are still organized around the waterfall development paradigm. There are separate silos within IT for development, testing, and deployment. These functions have to come together with each other and end users in the more collaborative and iterative process of big data application development. To do this, functional silos of expertise have to dissipate. 

Culturally (and perhaps organizationally) this changes the orientation of IT. The culture shift is likely to entail the creation of interdisciplinary functional teams instead of work handoffs from functional silo to functional silo. End users also become active participants on these interdisciplinary teams.

Fewer absolutes for quality

The testing of big data applications becomes more relative and less absolute. This is a tough adjustment for IT because in traditional transaction systems, you either correctly move a data field from one place to another, or you obtain a value based on data and logic that absolutely conforms to what the test script dictates. If you don’t attain absolute conformance, you retest until you do. 

SEE: Big data: How wide should your lens be? It depends on your use (TechRepublic)

Not so much with big data, which could start off with results being only 80% accurate, but with the business deeming them close enough to indicate an actionable trend.

Working in a context where less-than-perfect precision is acceptable is a challenging adjustment for IT pros, who are used to seeing an entire system blow up if a single character in a program or script is miskeyed.

The shift of big data into mission-critical systems

If you’re a transportation company, the ability to track your loads on the road and the health and safety of the cargo that they’re carrying becomes mission-critical. If you’re in the armed forces and you’re using drones on the battlefield to conduct and report reconnaissance in real-time flyovers, the data becomes mission-critical.

SEE: Big data success: Why desktop integration is key (TechRepublic)

This means that organizations must begin to attach the label of mission-critical to big data and analytics applications that formerly were classified as experimental. 

IT culture must shift to support mission-critical big data applications for failover, priority maintenance, and continuous development. This could shift IT personnel from traditional transaction support to big data support, requiring retraining to facilitate the change.

Also see

Source link

0
Continue Reading

Technology

Natural Active Ingredient Can Kill Actual COVID-19 Virus Within Two Minutes, First In The World

1 19

One of the leading laboratories accredited with U.S. Government agencies has released test results which confirm that Path-Away® – a plant-based active ingredient that contains no chemicals or alcohol – can kill the actual virus that causes COVID-19 within two minutes, the global distributor of Path-Away® announced today.

Natural Active Ingredient Can Kill Actual COVID 19 Virus Within Two

Image credit: Pixabay (Free Pixabay license)

Holista Colltech Limited (ASX: HCT, or Holista), the Malaysian-based global distributor, and Global Infection Control Consultants, LLC (GICC LLC), the developer of Path-Away®, said they believe the tests confirm the active ingredient to be the world’s first totally natural and safe organic disinfectant to meet the U.S. testing standard.

The independent tests of the Path-Away® Anti Pathogenic Aerosol Solution on SARS-CoV-2, the actual virus that causes COVID-19, were undertaken by Microbac Laboratories, Inc. (Microbac) in the United States. With over 50 years’ experience, Microbac is accredited under the U.S. Department of Defence (DoD) and Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program (ELAP).

The Microbac tests were conducted using the direct inoculation method and follow successful tests in an approved laboratory in the United Kingdom (completed in April 2020) of the efficacy of Path-Away® against the feline coronavirus which is a recognised surrogate of SARS-CoV-2. Path-Away® has also proven to be effective against a broad spectrum of microbes including the SARS and the H1N1 viruses.

Listed on the Australia Securities Exchange (ASX), Holista distributes Path-Away® under its own NatShield™ and Protectene™ brands. Apart from a hand sanitiser, Holista and GICC LLC are also co-developing a NatShield™ nasal balm that will include Path-Away®. This balm is expected to be launched before the end of 2020.

The latest test results will significanly accelerate efforts to roll out the M3 System®, also developed by GICC LLC, which can disinfect large buildings by dispensing Path-Away® through heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (“HVAC”) systems to treat harmful pathogens, including airborne viruses.

GICC LLC, based in Bluffton, South Carolina, has recently secured a 36-month contract with the U.S. Government to manufacture and install up to 10 million units of its M3 System® in large buildings. The system measures, monitors and contains airborne (aerosol) viruses, pathogens and other biological contaminants.

Holista and GICC LLC concurrently announced that they will form a 51:49 joint-venture company in Singapore which will have the rights to manufacture the M3 System® outside the United States. Holista is exclusive global distributor of the M3 System® excluding the United States, China and the Gulf states.

Apart from global distribution rights of Path-Away® for use as a sanitiser under the NatShield™ and Protectene™ brands, Holista also has rights to distribute Path-Away® for use in aerosolised disinfection of buildings using a high-pressure fogger.

Dr Arthur V Martin, the president of GICC LLC, commented: “To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time a completely natural, all-organic compound has been successfully proven to kill the actual virus causing COVID-19, to 99.9% within two minutes. We are excited because this will allow us to speed up the formal U.S. Government process of listing on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) “N-List”. EPA expects the products on “List N” to kill SARS-CoV-2 within two minutes. This will also allow for a wider use of this all-natural disinfectant for human use. The findings by Microbac confirm what we have known about the effectiveness of Path-Away® on other coronaviruses. The results are also particularly pleasing in light of recent research that showed that COVID-19 can survive on surfaces far longer than scientists had originally calculated.”

Dr. Roscoe Moore Jr., D.V.M., Ph.D., D.Sc., Former Assistant U.S. Surgeon and member of the Global Virus Network and its International COVID-19 Taskforce, said “There is a big need for natural and human friendly disinfectants that can be used frequently and safely without long term health side effects and while being environmentally safe. The recent tests from Microbac are most welcome as the public is looking for an agent that acts specifically against COVID-19”. Dr Moore also chairs Holista’s Scientific Advisory Board.

Dr Rajen Manicka, Chief Executive Officer of Holista, commented: “This product will address the significant untapped global market for all-natural disinfectants that are safe to be used on hands and faces. The results from Microbac will give our customers a greater level of confidence that NatShield™ and Protectene™ can be effective on skin, surfaces and as an aerosol, against the highly contagious COVID-19 causing virus. We have fielded enquiries from large organisations which need to disinfect buildings and facilities with sizeable human traffic. We are also preparing a submission to the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for approval to label our Natshield™ and Protectene™ range of sanitizing and disinfectant products, as well as to have Natshield approved for aerosol delivery through fogging units and through buildings’ HVAC systems in Australia.”

Information of Path-Away® and Microbac Test Results

How Path-Away® Works

Path-Away® attaches itself to the virus and inhibits its ability to take up amino acids – their basic building block. This forces the viruses to clump together, in the process killing themselves, almost instantly. The compound is environmentally safe with very low toxicity and does not harm humans and pets.

Details of Results of Tests Conducted By Microbac

– Cells containing the SARS-CoV-2 virus were seeded in 24-well plates and 2.0 mL (millilitres) of Path-Away® was added to the (live frozen samples – thawed out) dried virus inoculum and held for the contact time of 2 minutes at 21 degrees C with 53% relative humidity (RH). For the test to be deemed successful, Path-Away® must demonstrate a ≥ 3 Log10 reduction on each test carrier in the presence or absence of cytotoxicity.

– Path-Away® achieved this benchmark in each of the 24 instances (100% success rate). All controls met the criteria for a valid test and Microbac’s conclusions are based on observed data.

– Log Reduction stands for a 10-fold (one decimal) or 90% reduction in numbers of live bacteria. A 3-Log Reduction equates to a 99.9% reduction – greater than 1,000 time reduction in potentially harmful microorganisms.

– Path-Away®, killed 99.9% (≥ 3 Log10) of the COVID-19 causing virus on a hard surface after being exposed to Path-Away®.

– The full test report and process will be featured on the Holista website at https://www.holistaco.com/

Source: ACN Newswire




Source link

0
Continue Reading

Technology

Nokia 215 4G, Nokia 225 4G With VoLTE Calling, Wireless FM Radio Launched in India: Price, Specifications

nokia 225 4g image 1603182883105

Nokia 215 4G and Nokia 225 4G feature phones have been launched in India. The new Nokia phones support 4G VoLTE calling and come with wireless FM radio. The feature phones also include dedicated function keys and provide up to 24 days of standby time on a single charge. Nokia 225 4G also features a camera at the back to let users capture and share their memories on the go. Nokia 215 4G and Nokia 225 4G were originally launched in China earlier this month.

Nokia 215 4G, Nokia 225 4G price in India

Nokia 215 4G price in India has been set at Rs. 2,949, while Nokia 225 4G carries a price tag of Rs. 3,499. Nokia 215 4G comes in Black and Cyan Green colour options. In contrast, the Nokia 225 4G is offered in Black, Classic Blue, and Metallic Sand shades. Nokia 215 4G and Nokia 225 4G will be available for purchase through Nokia India online store from Friday, October 23, while offline retailers will start selling the phones from November 6. Nokia 225 4G will also be available through Flipkart from Friday.

Nokia 215 4G, Nokia 225 4G specifications

The dual-SIM (Nano) Nokia 215 4G and Nokia 225 4G share a similar list of specifications. Both run on RTOS based on the Series 30+ operating system and come with a 2.4-inch QVGA display. The phones also include 128MB of onboard storage that is expandable via microSD card (up to 32GB). In terms of connectivity, the Nokia 215 4G and Nokia 225 4G both have 4G VoLTE, Bluetooth 5.0, FM radio, Micro-USB port, and a 3.5mm headphone jack. The phones also come with a pre-installed MP3 player.

Nokia licensee HMD Global has also provided a 1,150mAh removable battery on both Nokia 215 4G and Nokia 225 4G. Speaking of differences, Nokia 225 4G carries a 0.3-megapixel snapper on the back to let you capture photos and videos in VGA resolution. It isn’t provided on Nokia 215 4G.

Nokia 215 4G doesn’t include a rear camera that’s featured on Nokia 225 4G

 

Nokia 215 4G and Nokia 225 4G measures 124.7×51.0x13.7mm. In terms of weight, the Nokia 215 4G is at 90.3 grams, while the Nokia 225 4G weighs 90.1 grams.


Flipkart, Amazon have excellent iPhone 11, Galaxy S20+ sale offers, but will they have enough stock? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.

Affiliate links may be automatically generated – see our ethics statement for details.

Source link

0
Continue Reading

Trending