Connect with us

(21 September 2020 – ESA) Monitoring the cryosphere is essential to fully assess, predict and adapt to climate variability and change. Given the importance of this fragile component of the Earth system, today ESA, along with Airbus Defence and Space and Thales Alenia Space, have signed a contract to develop the Copernicus Polar Ice and Snow Topography Altimeter mission, known as CRISTAL.

Copernicus Polar Ice and Snow Topography Altimeter (CRISTAL) mission (courtesy: Airbus)

With a launch planned in 2027, the CRISTAL mission will carry, for the first time on a polar mission, a dual-frequency radar altimeter, and microwave radiometer, that will measure and monitor sea-ice thickness, overlying snow depth and ice-sheet elevations.

These data will support maritime operations in the polar oceans and contribute to a better understanding of climate processes. CRISTAL will also support applications related to coastal and inland waters, as well as providing observations of ocean topography.

The mission will ensure the long-term continuation of radar altimetry ice elevation and topographic change records, following on from previous missions such as ESA’s Earth Explorer CryoSat mission and other heritage missions.

With a contract secured worth € 300 million, Airbus Defence and Space has been selected to develop and build the new CRISTAL mission, while Thales Alenia Space has been chosen as the prime contractor to develop its Interferometric Radar Altimeter for Ice and Snow (IRIS).

ESA’s Director of Earth Observation Programmes, Josef Aschbacher, says, “I am extremely pleased to have the contract signed so we can continue the development of this crucial mission. It will be critical in monitoring climate indicators, including the variability of Arctic sea ice, and ice sheet and ice cap melting.”

The contract for CRISTAL is the second out of the six new high-priority candidate missions to be signed – after the Copernicus Carbon Dioxide Monitoring mission (CO2M) in late-July. The CRISTAL mission is part of the expansion of the Copernicus Space Component programme of ESA, in partnership with the European Commission.

The European Copernicus flagship programme provides Earth observation and in situ data, as well as a broad range of services for environmental monitoring and protection, climate monitoring and natural disaster assessment to improve the quality of life of European citizens.

Source link

0

Space

Thales Alenia Space puts on track its Space Inspire product line

Thales Alenia Space puts on track its Space Inspire product

(27 November 2020 – Thales) Thales Alenia Space has announced that a major milestone for Space Inspire (INstant SPace In-orbit REconfiguration) development has been achieved by the accomplishment of the Preliminary Design Review (PDR).

Thales Alenia Space is developping this innovative product line with the aim to allow seamless telecommunication mission and services reconfiguration, instant in-orbit adjustment to the demand, outstanding flexibility for video broadcasting and broadband connectivity services while maximizing the efficiency & effective use of the satellite resources.

(courtesy: Thales Alenia Space /Briot)

This product line is supported by France’s space agency (CNES) with which a contract for satellite system engineering and development for phase CD activities has just entered into force in the frame of Space Inspire PIA (Plan d’Investissement d’Avenir), and by the European Space Agency’s through a dedicated Partnerships Project contract which has also entered into force and which will develop several building blocks outside France within an extensive European supply chain.

Space Inspire product line will embark major innovations :

  • A new design and architecture to fully fit new satellites communication environment, in particular regarding flexible payload and multi launches capability;
  • A new industrial approach enabling series production designed to lower cost satellites and reduced procurement schedule;
  • Major breakthroughs with disruptive technologies to allow European industries to take the lead on major innovations.

Following this Preliminary Design Review, Space Inspire product line is now entering into final design and qualification phases involving an industrial consortium all across Europe.

“We are delighted to put on track our Space Inspire product line thanks to the fruitful partnership and strong involvement of all the industries and agencies teams. Mixing extremely high capacity, unique agility, in-orbit reconfiguration, flexible coverage, this solution is perfectly adapted to operators’ expectations in the evolving telecommunication market” , declared Marc-Henri Serre, EVP Telecommunications at Thales Alenia Space.

“Space Inspire is based on advanced technologies both for payload and for platform with an important foot print in France. It will offer full in-orbit flexibility together with very attractive capacity and cost. CNES is strongly involved in the development of this new satellite generation since the preliminary definition phase, and will manage the satellite system phase CD contract for the french Investment Plan for the Future (PIA). The new product line should also benefit from building blocks developpment outside France through ESA coordination”, declared Caroline Laurent, Director of Orbital Systems at CNES.

Elodie Viau, Director of Telecommunications and Integrated Applications at ESA, says: “The next generation of satellites built as part of Space Inspire will be able to adapt almost instantly to customer demands. ESA is proud to support the European and Canadian space industries to develop innovative satellites for the competitive global telecommunications market. I congratulate all the Thales Alenia Space, CNES and ESA teams for their hard work and looking for the success of this project.”

About Thales Alenia Space

Drawing on over 40 years of experience and a unique combination of skills, expertise and cultures, Thales Alenia Space delivers cost-effective solutions for telecommunications, navigation, Earth observation, environmental management, exploration, science and orbital infrastructures. Governments and private industry alike count on Thales Alenia Space to design satellite-based systems that provide anytime, anywhere connections and positioning, monitor our planet, enhance management of its resources, and explore our Solar System and beyond. Thales Alenia Space sees space as a new horizon, helping to build a better, more sustainable life on Earth. A joint venture between Thales (67%) and Leonardo (33%), Thales Alenia Space also teams up with Telespazio to form the parent companies’ Space Alliance, which offers a complete range of services. Thales Alenia Space posted consolidated revenues of approximately 2.15 billion euros in 2019 and has around 7,700 employees in nine countries.

Source link

0
Continue Reading

Space

ViaLite provides SES with cross-border solution

ViaLite provides SES with cross border solution

(27 November 2020 – ViaLite) Radio frequency over fiber optic links are a great solution for moving high frequency analog signals over a long distance, but solutions need expert planning, design and installation to get the best performance.

When SES needed a long distance link from the European Space Agency Redu station in Belgium to the SES site in Luxembourg, ViaLite’s experience in the market and long distance link solutions made the company a winning choice for the project.

SES, a World Teleport Association (WTA) leading satellite operator, required a long distance link system which provided a high dynamic range in bandwidth and could be controlled remotely by SES operations staff. The distance between the SES site and the Redu station is over 120 km and crosses over the border between Belgium and Luxembourg.

ViaLite’s DWDM long distance link system was the chosen solution; installed at the two sites, with a third site at the border required for signal amplification and interconnect between the two countries. The technology used is capable of connecting sites that can be hundreds of kilometers apart and has full bandwidth capability from 700 MHz through to 2450 MHz. As part of the system, optical amplifiers, optical switches, multiplexers and de-multiplexers were supplied, as well as dispersion compensation module and delay lines; provided to help with optimizing and balancing.

SES’s teleport (courtesy: SES)

vialite 2vialite 3

ViaLite long distance link system (courtesy: ViaLite)

Steve Jones, a Senior Systems Engineer at SES, commented on the results: “We are over the moon, we couldn’t ask for more. ViaLite were extremely supportive and most importantly, it works!”

Amair Khan, from ViaLite, said: “It was a great project to work on. It’s rare to have the opportunity to deploy a fiber link across country borders. The solution we provided was adaptable in order to compensate for optical losses throughout the fiber system.”

Source link

0
Continue Reading

Space

Supercapacitors ready to deliver maximum power to space

Supercapacitors ready to deliver maximum power to space

(27 November 2020 – ESA) High-power supercapacitors – already found within terrestrial electric cars, trains, lifts and cranes – are on their way to space.

An ESA-led project with Airbus Defence and Space developed and tested a supercapacitor design able to provide brief bursts of very high power levels to space missions as required. Potential uses might include operation of high-power satellite radar systems, to stabilise overall onboard power during solar eclipses or other such events or launcher thrust vectoring.

Bank of supercapacitors engineering model (courtesy: ESA/Airbus Defence and Space)

“While traditional batteries store electric energy on a chemistry basis, supercapacitors do so on the basis of physics. The energy is stored as electrostatic charge, within an electrochemical double layer at the boundary between an organic electrolyte and activated carbon layers,” explains energy storage engineer Brandon of ESA’s Energy Storage section.

“This means they can both store and discharge power at a very fast rate that batteries cannot match, for many thousands of cycles with almost no internal resistance. However they have the corresponding disadvantage that they possess a lower overall energy density, so are able to store only a fraction the amount of energy of a battery with the same mass.”

Supercapacitors are, for instance, often used within electric and hybrid cars, storing the electric energy generated by braking wheels for later reuse and supplying power boosts for rapid acceleration.

“We performed an initial study of such a ‘Bank of Supercapacitors’ unit through ESA’s Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems, ARTES, programme,” adds Brandon. “We studied possible applications and which commercial cells could be feasible for the application in space. The results of this study were very promising.

“Then Airbus Defence and Space in France approached us, wanting to finalise and qualify such a design for space. This project proceeded on a co-funded basis through our General Support Technology Programme – preparing promising products for space and the marketplace.”

The first challenge was to design and construct a working prototype ‘Bank of Supercapacitors’ (BOSC), based on 34 supercapacitors in series with three strings in parallel, incorporating thermal sensors to keep it from overheating and degrading.

“To make these prototype BOSCs suitable for space required careful ‘potting’ – meaning the insertion of epoxy between the stacked supercapacitors, connectors and printed circuit boards,” adds Brandon.

“This sealant potting is needed for multiple reasons, firstly to help safeguard these delicate devices from the violent vibration of launch. It also prevents the unwanted interaction of bare wires and to minimise ‘outgassing’ of electrolyte from the supercapacitor can – the release of unwanted gases in the vacuum of space.”

BD Sensors in the Czech Republic– in charge of designing and manufacturing the BOSC – was responsible for developing this critical process.

Mechanical testing – coming down to violent, launcher-strength shaking, as well as exposure to space-quality vacuum and temperature extremes – took place at project partner EGGO Space in the Czech Republic. Radiation testing was also essential, involving kilorads of exposure, to check the bank would go on operating when exposed to the same kind of charged particles experienced in orbit.

Gabriel Beulaguet of Airbus Defence and Space, engineering and project manager for the project, comments: “we have set-up in our laboratory a long life test under relevant electrical, thermal and vacuum conditions. After more than 2.3 million cycles, the performances – especially in terms of fading and balancing – are behaving as expected and the test will continue to run”.

Testing the electrical performance of the BOSC involved millions of charge and discharge cycles, including a dedicated lifetime test campaign to look at ageing effects. In parallel, the BOSC was also subjected to ‘abuse’ testing – involving short circuits, overcharges and physical shock from impacts.

“We found the bank can take a huge amount of current, up to 400 amps, several times without damage,” adds Brandon.

Denis Lacombe of ESA’s Technical Reliability and Quality Division, technical officer for the project, explains: “Now that lifetime testing is about to conclude, after three years of hard work we have a space-qualified product, ready for use by Airbus and added to the European Preferred Parts List so other missions can make use of it as well, enabling high-power space applications of all kinds.”

Source link

0
Continue Reading

Trending