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Apple has released the public beta of watchOS 7 to provide Apple Watch users with a glimpse of all the new features that were announced at WWDC 2020 and are set to arrive this autumn – sometime in late September or early October. The watchOS 7 public beta includes features such as sleep tracking and automatic handwashing detection to deliver an advanced experience to all compatible Apple Watch models. Also, it brings additional customisation to watch faces including Chronograph Pro with the ability to a tachymeter and even allow users to download customised watch faces from websites.

This is notably the first time when Apple has released a public beta for watchOS. Up until now, the company offered its upcoming watchOS versions only through developer beta builds.

How to download watchOS 7 public beta

The watchOS 7 public beta can be downloaded on Apple Watch Series 3, Apple Watch Series 4, or Apple Watch Series 5 models. However, you won’t be able to get the new experience if you own an Apple Watch Series 1 or Apple Watch Series 2. Further, your iPhone must be running iOS 14 beta to let you install the new watchOS version on your Apple Watch.

To begin with the process, sign up for the Apple Beta Software Programme with your Apple ID. You can also check out our guide on how to download iOS 14 public beta if your iPhone is running on an earlier iOS version.

It is important to note that you won’t be able to move back to watchOS 6 after installing the public beta on your Apple Watch. Similarly, the beta version doesn’t include VoiceOver support. You may also encounter some bugs while using the public beta release.

watchOS 7 features

Apple introduced watchOS 7 in June with an enhanced personalisation. It lets you better configure watch faces and can even discover them through websites and social media posts. You can also add the tachymeter to the Chronograph Pro watch face. Further, Apple has provided support for developers to add more than one complication per app on a single watch face.

In addition to watch face-focussed changes, watchOS 7 brings the anticipated sleep tracking feature. It also uses the built-in motion sensors and microphone of the Apple Watch alongside on-device machine learning to enable automatic handwashing detection. Further, there are updates to the Noise app that debuted on watchOS 6 with the ability to answer how loudly users are listening to media through their headphones using their Apple devices and when these levels could impact their hearing.


WWDC 2020 had a lot of exciting announcements from Apple, but which are the best iOS 14 features for India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Google News. For the latest videos on gadgets and tech, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

1597130360 380 watchOS 7 Public Beta for Apple Watch Released to Give

Google Maps Returns to Apple Watch to Ease Navigation Process



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iPhone 12 mini Could Be a Part of 2020 iPhone Family, Rumours Suggest

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While Apple is busy preparing for the 2020 iPhone family, the rumour mill has now suggested that the smallest in the new series would be called none other than the iPhone 12 mini. This could be the fourth model in the iPhone 12 range that is likely to debut as soon as next month. The iPhone 12 mini title makes some sense if we look at Apple’s product line that includes the iPad mini and Mac mini; there was also an iPod mini in the past. The Cupertino company has so far avoided the “mini” moniker for its iPhone series, though.

Tipster who uses a Twitter handle L0vetodream initially suggested the existence of the iPhone 12 mini earlier this week. A tweet was posted by the tipster calling four new iPhone models the iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro, and the iPhone 12 Pro Max.

On Friday, another tipster, who last month shared photos of an iPad Air brochure that turned out to be true, posted an image allegedly showing stickers from unreleased silicone iPhone cases. One of those stickers carry the name of the iPhone 12 mini — alongside the iPhone 12 Pro and the iPhone 12 Pro Max.

 

The tipster suggested that the iPhone 12 mini would come in a 5.4-inch size, while the iPhone 12/ iPhone 12 Pro would be the 6.1-inch model and the iPhone 12 Pro Max be the model. As noted by MacRumors, the image also suggested that the cases appear to be made for the iPhone carrying model numbers “MHL732M/A” and “MHLG32M/A” that both are not yet used by Apple.

Apple may bring the iPhone 12 mini in a design size similar to that of the iPhone SE 2020. However, you can expect some price difference that would help consumers pick an appropriate option in their budget.

Rumours around four new iPhone models in the 2020 lineup aren’t new as various reliable sources suggested the development in the past. Nevertheless, the iPhone 12 mini being a part of the lineup is something quite new and interesting as the company has so far managed to avoid using the word “mini” in its iPhone lineup, though it did go with the “XR” and “SE” titles to bring some distinction.

That said, Apple is speculated to host a virtual event for the iPhone 12 family next month where it would ultimately announce the number and names of the new models.


Are Apple Watch SE, iPad 8th Gen the Perfect ‘Affordable’ Products for India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Google News. For the latest videos on gadgets and tech, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

1601157848 629 iPhone 12 mini Could Be a Part of 2020 iPhone

OnePlus Brings Android 11 Experience of Zen Mode to Its Phones Running on Android 10



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Why SaaS vendors like Snowflake love open source

opensource istock 664811638 ildo frazao

Commentary: For those who look at the success of SaaS services as portending bad things for open source, the opposite may be true.

Image: Ildo Frazao, Getty Images/iStockphoto

From the earliest days of MongoDB, co-founder Eliot Horowitz planned to build a managed database service. As he stressed in an interview, Horowitz knew that developers wouldn’t want to manage the database themselves if they could get someone to do it for them, provided they wouldn’t sacrifice safety and reliability in the process. The natural complement to open source, in other words, was cloud.

This isn’t to suggest cloud will kill open source. Though Redmonk analyst James Governor is correct to suggest that where developers are concerned, “Convenience is the killer app,” he’s also right to remind us that open source “is a great way to build software, build trust, and foster community,” factors that cloud services don’t necessarily deliver. Even as enterprise customers embrace more Software as a Service (SaaS) vendors like Snowflake or Datadog, open source software will matter more than ever.

Cloudy with a chance of open source

This fact can be overlooked in our rush to cloudify everything. Donald Fischer, CEO and co-founder of Tidelift, said, “Ten years from now much of the complexity around managing open source will be invisible to developers in much the same ways that cloud computing has made people forget about server blades and routers.” Responding to this sentiment, Hacker One CEO Marten Mickos stressed, “We simply MUST automate and package away the current complexities, because we are already busy creating new ones.” 

While this sounds great, not everyone is enthusiastic about the trend. 

SEE: Special report: Prepare for serverless computing (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

For one thing, as analyst Lawrence Hecht pointed out, it’s not clear we “want [open source] to be invisible” to the user. Sure, we might want to eliminate the bother of managing the code, he continued, “but having an auditable trail is valuable.” Even for those who don’t want to inspect or compile source code (and, let’s face it, that’s most of us), it’s useful to have that access, even if we outsource the work of digging into it.

In addition, there’s another risk, highlighted by Duane O’Brien: Eliminating user visibility into the open source software that powers managed cloud services “will also have the effect of adding an insulating layer between users and contributors. That insulating layer will further propagate the notion that open source is something done by other people, with several additional side effects.” One of the most deleterious of effects? It potentially exacerbates the sustainability of open source projects, as Alberto Ruiz noted. It may also reduce some of the enthusiasm developers feel for getting involved, Jason Baker argued.

But, really, this isn’t about cloud versus open source. It’s really a matter of shifting the focus for end users of that software, as Fischer went on to stress: “The analogy of cloud computing vs private data centers illustrates the opportunity: specialists doing the generic work upstream, freeing up time and brainpower to focus on new organization-specific capabilities further up the stack.”

Even for companies that offer proprietary services, open source is essential. Snowflake just went public with its proprietary data warehousing service, but underneath it’s open source software like FoundationDB. Datadog is similar, with Elasticsearch under the hood. And so on. 

We can be grateful for these SaaS companies that make it easier to consume open source software even as we recognize that they simply couldn’t exist without open source. 

Or, as Randy Shoup put it, it comes down to a convenience calculus: “If we have to operate infrastructure, we strongly prefer open source. If we can buy it as a service, we don’t really care what’s inside.” But the reason end users needn’t care is because builders continue to care a great deal about open source. That isn’t going to change anytime soon.

Disclosure: I work for AWS, but the views herein are mine and don’t reflect those of my employer.

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Sea Level Rise by 2.5 Metres Now Inevitable Even if Paris Climate Goals are Met, Study Shows

antarctic ice scaled

According to a new paper published in the journal Nature, thanks to a host of self-reinforcing, destabilising mechanisms, the slow melting of the Antarctic ice sheet will cause the sea level to rise by about 2.5 metres even if Paris climate goals are met and temperatures start to fall after reaching 2°C over pre-industrial levels.

“The more we learn about Antarctica, the direr the predictions become,” said co-author on the paper Anders Levermann from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. “We get enormous sea level rise even if we keep to the Paris agreement and catastrophic amounts if we don’t.”

According to Jonathan Bamber from the University of Bristol, who was not involved in the research, the study provides compelling evidence for the potentially devastating consequences of even moderate climate warming, which could lead to the removal of entire nations from the world map.

Sea Level Rise by 25 Metres Now Inevitable Even if

Stopping Antarctic ice from melting might no longer be a possibility. Image: Jason Auch via Wikimedia.org, CC BY 2.0

One of the key reasons why the ice sheet is unlikely to re-grow is hysteresis – an effect whereby the value of a physical property lags behind the effect which modulates it. As the ice melts, its surface drops and sits in warmer air, requiring lower temperatures to reform than to remain stable.

The study indicates that the ice sheet will “not regrow to its modern extent until temperatures are at least one degree Celsius lower than pre-industrial levels” – a feat that would be incredibly difficult to achieve at this point.

Given that the Antarctic ice sheet contains about half of the Earth’s fresh water, substantial global warming would lead to massive sea level rise, and that’s not even including the rise caused by melting ice in the Arctic Ocean and Greenland.

“Our results show that if the Paris Agreement is not met, Antarctica’s long-term sea-level contribution will dramatically increase and exceed that of all other sources,” conclude the researchers.

Sources: nature.com, theguardian.com




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