Connect with us

Samsung Galaxy S10 series has reportedly started receiving its August 2020 Android security patch, a couple of days ahead of the start of August. The South Korean electronics giant has become much faster with updates for its flagship smartphones in the recent past, and this is another example of its priority on the software front. As per a report, the update is so far available only in Germany for most of the Galaxy S10 models. The firmware version number of the build is G97xFXXU8CTG4.

SamMobile reports that Samsung has made the August 2020 security patch available in an update for the Galaxy S10 (SM-G973F), Galaxy S10+ (SM-G975F), and Galaxy S10e (SM-G970F). Although this new build is only available in Germany so far, similar builds can expected to be rolled out in other countries within the next few days. The report adds that as of now, users will not be able to downgrade to an older update after installing this new security update. Samsung usually pushes out security updates in batches like this.

For now, a changelog has not been provided, but the publication speculates based on the firmware version that the patch will come with more than just security changes. That being said, the change is not expected to be major, as the Samsung Galaxy S10 series was running the recently released One UI 2.1. You can check if your Samsung Galaxy S10 phone is eligible for the security update by opening Setting> Software update> Download and install.

Samsung has earlier announced that the Galaxy Unpacked event is set to take place on August 5, where the Galaxy Note 20 series is anticipated to be launched. Other Samsung devices expected to be unveiled at the Galaxy Unpacked event are the Galaxy Z Fold 2 5G, Galaxy Watch 3, Galaxy Buds Live, and Galaxy Tab S7.

The South Korean released a teaser recently, where it gave a sneak peek of the devices up for release. The event will take place in Suwon, South Korea, at its Digital City campus on Wednesday, August 5. The virtual event will be livestreamed on Samsung.com and Samsung Global Newsroom.


Why are smartphone prices rising in India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.

Source link

0
Continue Reading

Technology

Open source: Why governments need to go further

dc

Commentary: Yes, governments should open source their custom code. But more than that is needed.

Image: lucky-photographer, Getty Images/iStockphoto

For Drupal (and Acquia) founder Dries Buytaert, “the default [in government] should be ‘developed with public money, make it public code.'” That is, if a government is paying for software to be created, that software should be available under an open source license. While he acknowledged there might be exceptions (e.g., for military applications, as I’ve called out), his suggestion makes sense.

Years ago I argued that government mandates of open source made no sense. I still feel that way. Governments (and enterprises) should use whatever software best enables them to get work done. Increasingly, that software will be open source. But when good open source alternatives don’t yet exist, it makes no sense to mandate the use of suboptimal software. 

But software that governments create? There’s no compelling citizen-focused reason for closing it off. Instead, there are many reasons to open it up.

SEE: How to build a successful developer career (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

Of the people, by the people, for the people

This topic of why countries should embrace open source is an easy argument to make. As Buytaert pointed out, if public money pays for the code to be developed, why wouldn’t that code be available to the public (except, as mentioned, in the case of sensitive military software)? 

Some countries have already gone this route. As I detailed in 2016, Bulgaria is one of them. A few years later, Bulgaria has been preparing its own national source code repository, based on Git (as required by law: “administrative authorities shall use public storage and control systems for the source code and technical documentation for development, upgrading or deployment of information systems or electronic services”). 

This is a significant step toward greater transparency. However, it’s not enough.

SEE: Open source can thrive in a recession says Drupal creator Dries Buytaert (TechRepublic)

Collaborating on common government issues

As much as I understand Bulgaria’s desire to build its own source code repository, there’s even greater need for governments to collaborate on code beyond their borders. Think about it: Governments tend to do the same things, like collecting taxes, issuing parking tickets, etc. Currently, each government builds (or buys) software to tackle these tasks. Obscene quantities of custom code are created each year by government organizations operating in silos.

Why isn’t the city of Bogota sharing software with London, which shares software with Lagos, which shares software with Pocatello (that’s in Idaho, by the way)? 

As IBM president (and former Red Hat CEO) Jim Whitehurst said way back in 2009, “The waste in IT software development is extraordinary….Ultimately, for open source to provide value to all of our customers worldwide, we need to get our customers not only as users of open source products but truly engaged in open source and taking part in the development community.” This is particularly true in government, where there isn’t even the competitive pressure (e.g., Bogota doesn’t compete with Pocatello) that might prevent large financial institutions from collaborating (though even they partner on open source).

So, yes, we need governments to open source the software they pay to have built, to Buytaert’s point. But we also need those same governments to share that code beyond their borders, thereby driving greater innovation at lower cost for their citizens. 

Disclosure: I work for AWS but the views expressed herein are mine, not those of my employer.

Also see

Source link

0
Continue Reading

Technology

Elastica: A Compliant Mechanics Environment for Soft Robotic Control

artificial intelligence 3382507 960 720

Soft robots can be used in various spheres, such as agriculture, medicine, and defense. However, their complex physics means that they are hard to control. Current simulation testbeds are insufficient for taking the full advantage of elasticity.

A recent paper on arXiv.org proposes Elastica, a simulation environment tailored to soft robot context. It tries to fill the gap between conventional rigid body solvers, which are incapable to model complex continuum mechanics, and high-fidelity finite elements methods, which are mathematically cumbersome. Elastica can be used to simulate assemblies of soft, slender, and compliant rods and interface with major reinforcement learning packages. It is shown how most reinforcement learning models can learn to control a soft arm and to complete successively challenging tasks, like 3D tracking of a target, or maneuvering between structured and unstructured obstacles.

Soft robots are notoriously hard to control. This is partly due to the scarcity of models able to capture their complex continuum mechanics, resulting in a lack of control methodologies that take full advantage of body compliance. Currently available simulation methods are either too computational demanding or overly simplistic in their physical assumptions, leading to a paucity of available simulation resources for developing such control schemes. To address this, we introduce Elastica, a free, open-source simulation environment for soft, slender rods that can bend, twist, shear and stretch. We demonstrate how Elastica can be coupled with five state-of-the-art reinforcement learning algorithms to successfully control a soft, compliant robotic arm and complete increasingly challenging tasks.

Link: https://arxiv.org/abs/2009.08422