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(27 July 2020 – Paradigm Communication Systems) Paradigm is pleased to announce that their ultra-portable and compact SWARMKu X7 VSAT is now an approved Intelsat Qualified Terminal and fully qualified on the Intelsat FlexMove service.

(courtesy: Paradigm Communication Systems)

The Intelsat FlexMove managed service is specifically designed to support portable and lightweight terminals such as the SWARM. It enables fast, flexible and secure communications for mobility applications all over the world. In particular, it gives ground forces and emergency responders the mission agility they need to stay connected, however remote their location is, whilst only paying for the data they use.

The field-proven, ‘broadband in a backpack’ SWARM supports the need for rapid transport and setup being IATA compliant, and is PIM Powered for quick and simple pointing and optimised terminal performance.

The PIM controller provides a simple to use interface to the integrated modem, baseband switching, assisted pointing and setup functions for the SWARM and comes with a built-in visual crosshair and audio pointing device. As well as making pointing simple for any user, the PIM can support Power over Ethernet devices and provides a multitude of services to the end user – from VLAN setup and management to smart auto-selecting of AC and DC power interfaces.

FlexMove is powered by Intelsat’s award-winning global Epic high-throughput satellite (HTS) fleet, the world’s largest fixed satellite network, and the IntelsatOne ground network to provide users with a seamless global connectivity experience.

The FlexMove service delivers universal, high-speed satellite connectivity up to 20x faster than legacy MSS solutions for a fraction of the cost. A terminal can be brought online and connected in seconds with the user-friendly service portal.

Jon Godfrey, General Manager at Paradigm commented “the SWARM is easy-to-use and extremely portable, now on FlexMove its high throughput capabilities are available in the remotest locations on affordable and flexible plans.”

Joel Schroeder, Director for Land Mobile at Intelsat said, “the Paradigm SWARM is a great addition to the Intelsat FlexMove network. Designed to power portable and lightweight terminals, such as the SWARM, our ubiquitous, high-throughput FlexMove managed service helps end-users seamlessly and cost-effectively connect with confidence ― even in the most remote or challenging locations.”

About Paradigm

Paradigm is making satcom simple. We provide optimal, innovative and reliable satellite communication and control solutions at a competitive price.

Paradigm is a UK-based, independent and privately owned company with Europe’s largest satcom warehouse. Incorporating an extensive logistics capability, Paradigm is able to deliver extremely efficient and cost-effective global services and unique solutions, from the provision of satcom equipment and terminals to the design and installation of complete turnkey systems.

Paradigm has extensive engineering experience designing, manufacturing and delivering customised satellite terminals and earth stations for a wide range of industries and sectors, developing close relationships with customers, and giving valuable insight into their key requirements.

About Intelsat

As the foundational architects of satellite technology, Intelsat operates the world’s largest and most advanced satellite fleet and connectivity infrastructure. We apply our unparalleled expertise and global scale to connect people, businesses, and communities, no matter how difficult the challenge. Intelsat is uniquely positioned to help our customers turn possibilities into reality – transformation happens when businesses, governments, and communities use Intelsat’s next-generation global network and managed services to build their connected future.

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Space

MSSS To provide science cameras for Janus asteroid mission

MSSS To provide science cameras for Janus asteroid mission

(14 September 2020 – Malin Space Scence Systems) Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) has been selected to provide the science payloads for the two Janus spacecraft.

Last week, Janus was approved by NASA to proceed with final design of the mission hardware, including the MSSS cameras (called “JCam”).

The Janus principal investigator is Dr. Daniel Scheeres of the University of Colorado Boulder. The spacecraft will be built and operated by Lockheed Martin. The two Janus spacecraft will be launched in August 2022 on the same Falcon Heavy rocket as NASA’s Psyche spacecraft. They will fly by two small binary asteroids, 1991 VH and 1996 FG3, in March-April 2026.

An ECAM-M50 (Monochrome) with NFOV (Narrow Field of View) lens (left), ECAM-IR3 (right), and ECAM-DVR4 (center). JCam will appear similar to this flight camera system from another program, as JCam will use the same electronics with different lenses. Pocket knife for scale. (courtesy: Malin Space Science Systems)

msss 2

A rendering of the two Janus spacecraft showing the position of JCam. The apertures of the JCam visible and thermal IR cameras project from the inside of the spacecraft along its upper right edge. For scale, the deployed solar array span is a little less than 9 feet. (courtesy: Lockheed Martin)

Each spacecraft will carry a JCam system built by MSSS. JCam consists of an ECAM M50 visible camera and an ECAM IR3 thermal infrared camera, with a DVR4 processing/storage unit with 16 GB of flash memory. It will obtain images of the asteroid targets and also be used for spacecraft navigation and pointing during the flybys. Each complete JCam system weighs less than 3.2 kg and has a maximum power draw of less than 14 watts. These combined visible and thermal infrared imaging capabilities will enable JCam to characterize the current morphology of 1991 VH and 1996 FG3 and to constrain their evolution.

ECAM systems are flight-proven and currently operating on several missions, including NASA’s OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample-return spacecraft and Northrop-Grumman’s MEV-1 and MEV-2 satellite servicing missions. The development and production of the two JCam systems for Janus is being done under contract to Lockheed Martin for $5.8 million.

MSSS is also building the visible multispectral imaging science cameras for the Psyche mission, which will launch with Janus. Psyche is a NASA Discovery mission, led by Dr. Lindy Elkins-Tanton of Arizona State University and managed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It will arrive at the main belt asteroid Psyche in 2026.

Dr. Michael Ravine, JCam project manager at MSSS, said, “We are pleased that CU and Lockheed Martin selected MSSS to provide the payload for the two Janus spacecraft. JCam will return high resolution images of these asteroids and map the temperatures of their surfaces. It also means that a single launch will be carrying three spacecraft, going to three different targets, each with two MSSS cameras. That’s a first for us, maybe a first for anybody.”

MSSS has a long history of building and operating science instruments for NASA spacecraft, most recently five cameras on the Perseverance Mars rover, launched in August 2020 and scheduled to land on Mars in February 2021. We are also currently operating three cameras orbiting Mars on Mars Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, four on the surface of Mars on the Curiosity rover, and one orbiting Jupiter on Juno.

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Industry gets working on Europe’s Hera planetary defence mission

Industry gets working on Europes Hera planetary defence mission

(15 September 2020 – ESA) Today ESA awarded a €129.4 million contract covering the detailed design, manufacturing and testing of Hera, the Agency’s first mission for planetary defence.

This ambitious mission will be Europe’s contribution to an international asteroid deflection effort, set to perform sustained exploration of a double asteroid system.

Hera – named after the Greek goddess of marriage – will be, along with NASA’s Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) spacecraft, humankind’s first probe to rendezvous with a binary asteroid system, a little understood class making up around 15% of all known asteroids.

Hera scans DART’s impact crater (courtesy: ESA)

The contract was signed today by Franco Ongaro, ESA Director of Technology, Engineering and Quality, and Marco Fuchs, CEO of Germany space company OHB, prime contractor of the Hera consortium. The signing took place at ESA’s ESOC centre in Germany, which will serve as mission control for the 2024-launched Hera.

Hera is the European contribution to an international planetary defence collaboration among European and US scientists called the Asteroid Impact & Deflection Assessment, AIDA. The DART spacecraft – due for launch in July 2021 – will first perform a kinetic impact on the smaller of the two bodies. Hera will follow-up with a detailed post-impact survey to turn this grand-scale experiment into a well-understood and repeatable asteroid deflection technique.

While doing so, the desk-sized Hera will also demonstrate multiple novel technologies, such as autonomous navigation around the asteroid – like modern driverless cars on Earth – while gathering crucial scientific data, to help scientists and future mission planners better understand asteroid compositions and structures.

Hera will also deploy Europe’s first ‘CubeSats’ (miniature satellites built up from 10 cm boxes) into deep space for close-up asteroid surveying, including the very first radar probe of an asteroid’s interior – using an updated version of the radar system carried on ESA’s Rosetta comet mission.

Due to launch in October 2024, Hera will travel to a binary asteroid system – the Didymos pair of near-Earth asteroids. The 780 m-diameter mountain-sized main body is orbited by a 160 m moon, formally christened ‘Dimorphos’ in June 2020, about the same size as the Great Pyramid of Giza.

DART’s kinetic impact into Dimorphos in September 2022 is expected to alter its orbit around Didymos as well as create a substantial crater. This moonlet asteroid will become unique, as the first celestial body to have its orbital and physical characteristics intentionally altered by human intervention. Hera will arrive at the Didymos system at the end of 2026, to perform at least six months of close-up study.

Hera’s mission control will be based at ESA’s ESOC centre in Darmstadt, Germany, also the home of ESA’s new Space Safety and Security programme, of which Hera is a part.

This contract signing covers the full Hera satellite development, integration and test, including its advanced guidance, navigation and control (GNC) system. Contracts for Hera’s two hosted CubeSats and relevant technology developments are already ongoing.

Hera’s European partners

The contract has been awarded to a consortium led by prime contractor OHB System AG in Bremen.

Of 17 ESA Member States contributing to Hera, Germany is in the forefront, tasked with the overall Hera spacecraft design and integration, main navigation cameras, tanks, thrusters, high-gain antenna, reaction wheels, and mass memory unit.

Italy is leading the mission’s power and propulsion subsystems, and is providing the deep-space transponder that will enable the mission’s radioscience experiment. In addition, Italy is leading the dust and mineral prospecting CubeSat, named after the late Andrea Milani, distinguished professor and leading asteroid scientist.

Belgium is developing Hera’s on-board computer and software, the brain of the spacecraft, plus its power conditioning and distribution unit – the heart of its electrical subsystem. It is also contributing to Hera’s Japanese-developed thermal imager and CubeSats operations center at ESA/ESEC.

Luxembourg is leading the radar-hosting ‘Juventas’ CubeSat and the inter-satellite communication system allowing the two Hera CubeSats to communicate with Earth through an innovative network using Hera as data relay.

Portugal and Romania are developing the laser altimeter which will provide crucial information for the autonomous navigation functions. In addition, Romania is developing the image processing unit, harness and the electrical test equipment (while also contributing to its GNC development).

The Czech Republic is responsible for the full satellite structure, payload software (to command the instruments), independent software validation and ground support equipment for pre-flight satellite testing. It is also providing components for Juventas’ low-frequency radar and data processing software on the second CubeSat.

And Spain is developing Hera’s advanced guidance, navigation and control system as well as the deep-space communication system. It is also providing the Juventas gravimeter instrument.

  • Austria is supporting with mission data analysis and processing
  • Denmark is contributing to the Juventas CubeSat and remote terminal unit
  • France is providing Juventas’ low-frequency radar, as well as star trackers and support to the CubeSats’ payload operations planning and close-proximity trajectories
  • Hungary is supporting scientific calibration of the cameras
  • The Netherlands is developing the new deep-space CubeSat deployment system and providing Hera’s Sun sensors
  • Switzerland is contributing with structural elements and mechanisms for the solar arrays
  • Finland is providing the second CubeSats’ multi-spectral imager and onboard equipment. It is also providing the data processing unit
  • Poland is contributing with Juventas’ low-frequency radar deployable antennas
  • Ireland is providing an innovative inertial measurement unit for the Hera spacecraft to support deep-space navigation
  • ESA Associate Member State Latvia is contributing a time-of-flight detector for the mission’s laser altimeter.

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Dust monitor to demonstrate pristine satellite launches

Dust monitor to demonstrate pristine satellite launches

(17 September 2020 – ESA) While on Earth, satellites are kept in immaculate cleanrooms to protect their instruments from harmful dust particles.

If those instruments fail to function properly in space, however, it could be because of particle contamination during launch. Now a British company has developed a device to identify whether this is the case.

Following successful trials of a prototype sensor, space-tech company XCAM is working with ESA to develop a flight-ready device that monitors dust contamination on payloads during and shortly after launch.

The device will provide data to demonstrate whether or not precious cargos – such as Earth-observing satellites – stay clean on their way into space.

XCAM’s prototype monitoring device (courtesy: ESA)

Payloads are protected from the elements within a secure capsule in the upper part of launcher called the fairing. Once outside the Earth’s atmosphere, the fairing separates, exposing its contents to space.

Cleanrooms protect spaceborne equipment from contamination during assembly, but vibrations and shocks during launch may shake up residues in the fairing that can affect how the payload operates.

Dust particles can contaminate optical surfaces, such as those found on Earth-observing satellites, as well as affecting the performance of sensitive mechanical equipment.

XCAM’s sensor keeps track of contamination remotely to provide continuous measurements in real-time.

The company is now working with ESA to develop a device that will be used in the fairing of the European Vega-C launcher. The gadget must be able to withstand the mechanical loads of launch such as acoustics and vibrations – and then survive in space for long enough to relay data back to Earth for analysis.

It will enable satellite launchers to provide evidence to their customers that payloads are kept spotless on their way into orbit.

“It was fantastic for XCAM to work on such an exciting project with ESA at the prototype stage, but to have been able to go beyond that, and win the contract to develop the flight qualified system is even better,” says Karen Holland, chief executive of XCAM.

“Following these achievements, XCAM has recently received several highly prestigious awards nominations for our work in the field of digital imaging systems. As a very small company of just 15 people, we are very pleased to be recognised by the awards judges.”

“Because of the very peculiar contamination mechanisms it presents, and the lack of monitoring inside the fairing, the launch phase is somewhat of an unresolved question for contamination engineers – which makes control of particulate very challenging,” says Riccardo Rampini, technical officer for the XCAM project.

“With the development of a novel sensor capable of operating before and during launch, which will provide real-time information on the particulate inside the fairing of a launcher, ESA will soon provide a solution to this problem.”

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